Irish White Pudding

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Irish White Pudding

Some time back I posted about my trials of an Irish White Pudding recipe that I developed in collaboration with my forum mate John. His blog is mainly about curry but he also makes sausage, bacon, hams and luncheon meats.

Now, I have to admit, I can take-or-leave these Irish delicacies but I believe that this recipe is as close to the commercial ones, that I was sent, as we can get.

The final recipe stood up to the 'John's mother-in-law' test and passed with flying colours. John has since amended his version, but I'm happy with the original one. I may increase the amount of onion, not just for the fun of it, but because I have recently found the ingredients specification for Clonakilty White Pudding and notice that it has significantly more onion.

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Monday 21 July 2014

Old Cure Recipes

Twice recently the subject of old curing recipes has come up: once in relation to a recipe from a Jane Grigson book, and the other regarding an American Corned beef recipe. Neither person had any qualms about using the recipe; the questions they asked were unrelated to the advisability of using the cure. However, in using older cure recipes, there are a number of things that we need to consider.

old curing books

The first is the amount of curing salt used on the meat. In old recipes, this will generally be in the form of saltpetre (potassium nitrate), Chile saltpetre (sodium nitrate) or even Sal Prunella - a salt made by fusing saltpetre into balls, which produces minute quantities of potassium nitrite enabling the curing process to start more quickly. Many older recipes contain levels of these salts well above the levels considered safe nowadays.

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Saturday 05 July 2014

My Favourite Bacon

I recently posted a bacon tutorial that I wrote for the sausage making forum. The recipe used was an amalgamation of a few already posted by myself and others, as such it was a compromise. Whilst it makes very nice bacon, it is a little sweet for me. The recipe I use most regularly differs in that it's more salty and has less sugar. The method and other instructions are exactly the same as in the bacon and dry curing tutorial.

For 1kg of meat use:

22gm Salt
8gm Sugar
2.5gm Cure #1
0.5gm Sodium ascorbate (optional)

Use the cure pro rata for other weights of meat adding whatever herbs and spices you like.

To aid calculation you can use this cure calculator:

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Wednesday 11 June 2014
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Mild Bacon

Mmm...BaconBack in 2010, when I posted the bacon tutorial online, I used a recipe with fairly low levels of salt. Many people liked it and it still forms the basis for the tutorial today. That said, it's not the recipe that I use, so I've removed the online calculator from the recipe and put it here to separate the calculators from the tutorials.

Mild Bacon

The ingredients for 1kg of meat are:

18.5gm Salt
10gm Sugar
2.5gm Cure #1
0.5gm Sodium ascorbate (optional)

Use the cure pro rata for other weights of meat adding whatever herbs and spices you like.

For other sizes of meat it's easiest to use this calculator...

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Sunday 04 May 2014

Whole Green Fig Preserve

Figs

Following my recipe for fig jam online, I was contacted by a very nice guy called John Titterton who said:

I noticed your blog update with the fig jam recipe and thought I would pass this recipe on to you. It is made using green figs - harvested just before they ripen on the tree. The preserved figs are best eaten with a nice soft cheese such as Brie or Camembert, but are also good with some harder cheeses. Maybe even a nice home smoked cheese and crackers!

The recipe was from my father, who used to make a few hundred bottles at a time and passed to me after his death. I make a batch every year if I am at home, but they do not last too long!

Regards,
John Titterton
Cape Town, South Africa.

Regrettably, the file he attached became corrupted when I lost a lot of my emails, and with one thing and another, it's taken this long for me to be able to put John's dad's recipe online.

Whole Green Fig Preserve

Ingredients:
100 green figs
2 tablespoons bicarbonate of soda
3.4 litres water

Method:

  • Scrub the figs and cut a cross into the end opposite the stalk.
  • Mix the water and bicarbonate of soda and soak the figs overnight.
  • Remove from the water and weigh the figs, recording the weight.
  • Place into clean boiling water and boil for 15 minutes or until soft.
  • Drain and then dry the figs well, removing excess water.
Syrup:
  • For each 500g figs or part thereof, mix 500ml water with 500g sugar.
  • Boil the syrup until it just starts to thicken.
  • Add the figs and boil until the syrup is thick.
  • Add 1 tablespoon lemon juice for each 250g figs and just bring to the boil again before removing from the heat and letting cool.
  • Bottle the figs and cover with the syrup.

Note 1: If the syrup froths whilst boiling, add a small lump of butter.

Note 2: A small stick of ginger can be added during the boiling process to add a slightly different flavour.

Many thanks John.

Saturday 07 December 2013
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